Following a hugely successful two week run in

New York’s off Broadway Barrow Street Theatre and a sell out NYF performance in Christ Church Cathedral

Galway International Arts Festival presents

'IN BETWEEN SILENCE'

July 23rd @ 5.30pm

  O'Donoghue Centre Theatre NUI Galway

Tickets

 FEATURING STORIES FROM

Anne Enright, Theo Dorgan, Paula Meehan, Joseph O'Connor, Vanessa Ronan, Roddy Doyle, Tony Curtis, Denise Dunphy.

New York Reviews
Rosie Vaughn 7/12/16 (theasy.com New York) “ In Between Silence, where we really exist is a sensory experience and a master class in storytelling, using beautiful soundscapes to subtly underscore the beautiful complexity of the human experience. I have always been of the frame of mind that nobody has quite managed to master the art of storytelling as skillfully as the Irish. For some reason, the importance of language, legacy, and oral tradition passed down through generations just seems to ring exceptionally true and deep when tied to the Emerald Isle. In Between Silence, a sensory multimedia experience developed and directed by self-proclaimed “Song Poet” Stano, reinforces this belief”. 
http://www.theasy.com/Reviews/2016/I/inbetweensilencewherewereallyexist.php
Emmanuel Tuohey 2/12/16 (Irish Times) “Stano’s biggest challenge may be handling the exponential growth of this new art form. Other artists are keen to participate in the project and tell their stories. And he has received interest from people in the mental health and prison systems in Dublin, who think the storytelling may have therapeutic value for residents and inmates alike. Stano and Dunphy are naturally delighted with the response, but what matters to them is the truism spoken by another participant, photographer John Minihan, who said, “What remains is the photograph”. In other words, what matters is the final product”.
 http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/in-between-silence-debuts-in-manhattan-1.2890944
Joseph Charnitski 10/12/16 (exeunt Magazine New York) “Maintaining flexible definitions of cinema, theater, and storytelling is a valuable component of keeping an open mind to the arts. Add to that this mix of public and private, the sharing of my “imaginative space” with other people as they process these stories and the experience of hearing them their own way, and you have an active, engaged, vibrant evening”.
http://exeuntmagazine.com/reviews/review-silence-really-exist-barrow-street-theatre/   
K. Krombie 10/12/16 (Stage Buddy – New York)“There are myriad ways to tell stories, but a voice in the dark has a proximate visceral effect. Listening becomes heightened while the eyes follow the trace of – in this case – intimate recollections including stories passed on through networks of blood and empathy. ‘In Between Silence, where we really exist’ is a collection of true stories recorded by chiefly Irish writers, produced by Irish composer and one-time Dublin punk scenester Stano to music of his own making” 
http://stagebuddy.com/reviews/review-silence-really-exist                                        

RODDY DOYLE (Sept 1st 2016) "Working with Stano was an extraordinary, surprising experience.  I was deeply moved when I first heard the music that he had joined to my words, and how he’d filled and stretched the gaps between the words and sentences, how he’d taken a couple of hundred spoken words and made - to my ear - something brand new, a new form of story-telling - out of them."
STANO (Arena RTE Radio May 19th 2016) “What I’m trying to do is underpin the story with an atmosphere, with a mood, because stories are really visual and my background is in manipulating sound and almost doing a soundtrack to a film that doesn’t exist, that’s really what I’m doing. Its harking back to when we sat around the fire telling stories, the crackle of the fire would have been the soundscape, I’m trying to recreate that feeling”.  
DERMOT BOLGER (Launch - Lighthouse Cinema May 23rd 2016) “I listened to Brian Palms story and within 90 seconds of it I knew that I trusted Stano implicitly and that sense of trust is so important. You don’t always trust people and particularly when you’re a writer, because you’re dealing with producers and people are trying to make you say things in a certain way and there was a sense that here was somebody who was opening up this space where you could say what you wanted to say”. 
THEO DORGAN  (Arena (RTE Radio May 19th 2016 / Launch - Lighthouse Cinema May 23rd 2016) “Stano is an unseen but very strong force inside the artistic life of this country” 
“It’s a kind of a paradox, Stano has brought us to the cinema to listen to stories and look at nothing, but of course you’re not looking at nothing, you’re looking at something that’s inside the whole imaginative space of your own consciousness. One of the great joys of going to theatre or cinema or a concert is that you’re there with other people to whom the same thing is happening, but everyone is processing it differently, so it’s a kind of a 4 dimensional event. There’s an image at the end of each piece so you do get a little bit of visual stimulus but the stimulus is in the sounds and in the words, it’s in the soundscape. It’s more than what we think of as music”. 
“I don’t think I’ve ever experienced such a kaleidoscope of images in the dark, it’s the most powerful film I’ve seen in years and there’s about 30 seconds of images. The way the soundscape takes sounds out of the world and sounds out of the stories and makes something that just travels you into the story it’s really quite uncanny”.
“It's not a soundtrack to a poem or a story, people put poems and stories to music or they put music to poems, this is something completely different The story line carries itself and the music carries itself and somehow insinuates itself into and around and over and above the story so it’s a total experience, I have not heard anything like it, I was just blown away by it.”
“There was a great renaissance back in the 70s, the likes of Paula Meehan, John Borrowman and Stano came out of it, so it was part of the legendary background of my idea of Dublin. I always knew that he was extremely experimental and very brave, afraid of nothing, he would try anything and I had a particular poem with 2016 coming up, I wanted to talk about the men and women of 1916 and what they gave for us and to us. When Stano played my piece back to me, I wasn’t listening to the poem, I was listening to the sorrow, the sorrow of those people”
“When somebody draws it out, the way Stano has, something else happens and in this tawdry, over busy world we live in, to have been away and sent, as we all have been is an extraordinary thing and the only way I can describe it is as magic”.
AUDIENCE MEMBER (Tom Fennell)  “It strikes me that it’s not so much magic but reality, all the stories were so deeply, internally, universally real and the reality that we all share, is the magic”.